Entry: Angels in our midst Monday, May 09, 2005




I love nurses and doctors.

No, lah, not the game and not in that kinky way.

They are our unsung heros.

Well, some may argue that they are paid to do their jobs. 

In my opinion, unless you are altruistic to some degree, you can't work in a hospital.

 

I was a medic in the army.

As an instructor, I had the privilege to work in hospital wards alongside nurses and doctors for several weeks.

Imagine having to tend to patients round the clock, feed them, clean them, clear their waste etc etc.  Although the patients are mere strangers, the care they receive from the medical staff will not fall short of that given by any family member.

 

We were hit by SARS in 2003.

Docs and nurses did not shirk from their duties for fear of their lives.

Instead, they stuck to their guns to battle the deadly disease.

I'm not sure if I'd have the guts to do so.

Now that SARS is over, Singapore seems to have forgotten our angels in white.

I must admit I'm one of them until my mum in law was warded for her angioplasty this month.  Once again, i witnessed the selflessness and dedication of the medical staff.

 

If you have friends who are medical staff, drop them a sms now to thank them for their service to society.  Some of us will not be alive today had it not been for their hard work and labour of love.

 

   4 comments

Jaywalk
May 10, 2005   01:59 AM PDT
 
Just got out of the hospital in Ch1na today.

Makes realised how we have taken our own medical facilities for granted, even if in C2 ward of SGH.

I blogged about it. Feel free to drop by.
Dicta
May 9, 2005   03:20 PM PDT
 
Saya Suka Missi dan Lo kun. Sedap!
Dicta
May 9, 2005   03:18 PM PDT
 
Nurses. Yums. The first person I saw in my life and probably the last too. I love nurses. Anyone married (or is married to) a nurse, pray tell pray tell.
Golani ben-Yuri
May 9, 2005   12:26 PM PDT
 
Agree - especially the nurses, but even more so the nurses of yore when hospitals were totally government-owned entities, before privatisation.

Meaning that the nurses then were definitely local, and the system was based on the British colonial system with emphasis on discipline

With the advent of privatisation, foreign nurses were introduced and a lot of interpersonal connection with the patients had been lost. This was exacerbated by the incorporation of American style of management - becoming too commercialised and focussing upon hardcore professionalism

Should know better, my late Mom was a nurse of the old school

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